GM Inside News Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,889 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought this was mostly positive. They seem to like the interior for the most part (not sure if Europe gets better materials than we do) and said the stick was okay.

Even the comments by the Brits were mostly good. I was surprised -- Check them out HERE.

Regardless, I'm glad that Chrysler has a competitive product here and would love to see it do well in Europe where MPVs seem to take up a good portion of the market.



SOURCE: AutoCar

Dodge Journey 2.0 CRD SXT
Test date 24 September 2008
Price as tested £19,995
For: Creative storage spaces, robust interior trim, seven seats, family friendliness
Against: Cumbersome dynamics, agricultural engine, heavy handbrake

BACKGROUND:

Dodge has always been Chrysler’s testosterone-infused brand. The Charger and Challenger muscle cars of the 1960s and the still-current Viper of the 1990s emphasise the point.

But Dodge also has a history of MPVs — or, as they’re called in the US, minivans — starting with the 1984 Dodge Caravan, available in both SWB and LWB versions.

To be a Dodge, a car has to be big, brash and square. It must ooze Americana. Which is why Dodge has styled the Journey – at heart an MPV – with the looks of an SUV. Does this ‘best of both worlds’ concept work? That’s what we aim to find out.

Dodge’s stablemate, Chrysler, no longer sells a standard-size Voyager MPV in Europe, merely a Grand version.

That’s where the Journey comes in, providing seven seats in a package that, while hefty by European standards, is still smaller than a Voyager. And its faux-4x4 styling may well appeal to those who like to make a rugged, active, lifestyle statement.

The Journey’s aping of a 4x4 character even extends to the way it drives. This Mexican-built Dodge offers two engines for Europe: the 2.4-litre, petrol-fuelled ‘world engine’ used also by Mitsubishi and Hyundai and matched only to the entry SE trim level, and Volkswagen’s versatile 138bhp 2.0-litre turbodiesel, available in SE, SXT or RT spec and with an optional DSG-type Getrag transmission.

Our test car is a regular six-speed manual turbodiesel in SXT trim.

DESIGN

A Dodge must have a bold grille with bars simulating the cross-hairs of a gunsight. It must also have big wheels under exaggerated arches and a solid, boxy shape – in short, rugged and macho.

Under Dodge’s current design parameters the Journey could hardly not look the way it does; if it’s going to be a tall seven-seater, 4888mm long, 1878mm wide and 1691mm high, it’s going to look like an SUV.

The transverse engine and front-wheel drive is a surprise considering its looks, but the platform is lifted from the Dodge Avenger saloon (not a promising start, some may argue).

That said, the design includes multi-link rear suspension and rubber-mounted subframes front and rear, so you’d expect reasonable refinement.

The main design interest inside – apart from a plethora of features whose labels are suffixed with TM – is the way the centre and rear seats fold to facilitate access and cargo-carrying.

ON THE ROAD

Even a healthy 138bhp isn’t going to make a huge impression on something this heavy (1895kg) and bluff-shaped. But the Journey still steps away from the lights pretty briskly, thanks to its ample low-end torque (229lb ft between 1750 and 2500rpm). That urge keeps the Journey feeling superficially brisk provided the turbocharger is stoked up, but ask any more of it and there isn’t much.

You can eventually wind the Journey up to a claimed 116mph before airflow defeats it, and cruising is restful with gearing around 30mph per 1000rpm in sixth.

Acceleration is still useful at motorway speeds in top gear, but when you work the engine harder and faster the constant clattery drone starts to gets to you.

Clutch take-up is smooth and the gearshift is accurate enough, if clonky in its across-gate motion. The brakes feel fine, too, and have the right level of progression and sensible weighting.

The Journey looks like an SUV and that’s how it feels to drive. You sit well above the roll axis, so you’re conscious of an SUV-like top-heavy motion and movement as the body leans.

Not that it leans too much, thanks to stiff anti-roll bars that have the side effect of setting up lateral rocking over lumpy surfaces. This roll stiffness makes the steering quite precise, and the Journey can be hustled through twists with more vigour than you’d expect.

Most of the time it goes where it’s pointed and has fair traction out of tightish corners. The suspension’s tautness inevitably makes the ride fidgety on poor roads, an irritation that becomes more obvious the further towards the back you sit, but fundamental body control is good and the rubber-mounted subframes do a fine job of filtering out road roar.

Opt for the MyGIG sat-nav, though, and you get a ParkView reversing camera to make life easier.
MORE HERE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,334 Posts
Dodge proved they were able to make a decent interior. If they only got rid of that steering wheel...
Honestly one thing amazes me, the dashboard looks better than the one in Challenger - ouch.

here are some shots of the official Polish Journey launch. Chrysler provided girls, free drinks and a classic Challenger to make people come and see the rather bland Van. :p:




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,633 Posts
How fast

* 0-30mph 3.8 sec
* 0-60mph 11.1 sec
* 0-100mph 39.3 sec
* 0-150mph no data
* 0-200mph no data
* 30-70mph no data
* 0-400m 18.5 / 76 sec/mph
* 0-1000m 33.8 / 95.8 sec/mph
* 30-50mph in 3rd/4th 4.5 / 6.6
* 40-60mph in 4th/5th 6.6 / 9.3 sec
* 50-70mph in 5th 9.4 sec
* 60-0mph no data
* Top speed 116 mph
* Noise at 70mph 66 dbA

How thirsty? < Imperial gallons>

* Test average 33.5 mpg < US approx. 27.9 mpg >
* Test best/worst 41.1 / 20.2 < US approx. 34.22 - 16.82 mpg >

Government figures < Note: 'worst' two of the three numbers available >

* Combined/urban 43.5 / 33.6 mpg < US approx. 36.22 / 27.98 mpg >
* CO2 emissions 170 g/km
Engine

* Layout 4 cyls In Line , 1968 cc
* Max power 138 bhp at 4000 rpm <MB 204 >
* Max torque 229 ft at 1750 rpm < MB 369 >
* Specific output 73.0 bhp per litre
* Power to weight 80bhp per tonne bhp per tonne
This is not the best example of a diesel PT. for this vehicle in terms of application for the US.

Still, consider these numbers compared to whats offered here.

2.4 World Engine
4-Speed Automatic Transmission 173 hp
19 city/ 25 hwy* - -
3.5L V-6 Engine
6-Speed Automatic Transmission with AutoStick® - 235 hp
16 city/ 23 hwy* 235 hp
15 city/ 22 hwy* <AWD>
******************

Now consider the currently and recently available ( International only) 6sp. DSG AT - combined with a more modern and appropriately sized diesel - like the BARELY LARGER MB '2.2'L inline 4.

More than likely , you would pick up considerable performance and and least a little fuel economy - if not more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,579 Posts
So are these assembled in Europe like the Grand Voyager was/is?
Nope, with the USD so low Chrysler ceased assembling Voyagers and most other models in Graz. Actually, if they had some really competitive products, their relative lack of fixed production capacity in Europe could have benefitted them enormously in terms of market share and profits (enormously referring to their relative position, not in absolute sense).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,881 Posts
Just released in OZ.
How do these compare to the Lambda quads?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,579 Posts
1. Smaller and more manageable size (think Ford Galaxy/S-Max or Mazda MPV)

2. Third row not completely useless, but still rather "emergency seating capacity"

3. Uglier than Enclave or Acadia, but not as grotesque as the Traverse

4. Much smaller overall

5. Still a heavy gas hog, though presumably much more fuel efficient than the Lambdas (no contest to "old world" minivans though).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,424 Posts
1. Smaller and more manageable size (think Ford Galaxy/S-Max or Mazda MPV)

2. Third row not completely useless, but still rather "emergency seating capacity"

3. Uglier than Enclave or Acadia, but not as grotesque as the Traverse

4. Much smaller overall

5. Still a heavy gas hog, though presumably much more fuel efficient than the Lambdas (no contest to "old world" minivans though).
Right on the money :yup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,881 Posts
Thanks guys.
may have a sticky.

Mind you in Australia we have a great tradition of mocking incompentent tradesmen or charlatens as "Dodgey Bros"....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,424 Posts
Thanks guys.
may have a sticky.

Mind you in Australia we have a great tradition of mocking incompentent tradesmen or charlatens as "Dodgey Bros"....
:lmao: :lmao: :lmao:

Glad to see we're (NA) not the only market where Dodge is somewhat disparaged...... ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,881 Posts
Not so much Dodge originally. But we use Dodgey to describe a suspect action. So, if a tradesman comes around and gerrybuilds your new shed, or perhaps passes a bad cheque, you could describe them as dodgey. you might say to your mate - "gee mate, have a look at me new shed, it was built by Dodgey Brothers...."

So, I find the reintroduction of Dodge, started by the Dodge Bros, slightly amusing.
Especially after all the Al Bundy Dodge jokes.
Also, my father had told me of an advertising feud back in the old days where Dodge had a jingle knocking Ford, Ford responding with the jingle "If you can't afford a Ford, dodge a Dodge". I don't know if that was just an Aussie thing.

Then the new logo that looks like a school book sketch of the female reproductive system....
and a desire to style every vehicle to look like a truck.........
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top