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Apple and Tesla suppliers halt production as ‘unprecedented’ power crisis hits China
APPLE and TESLA suppliers have both reportedly halted production in China as an "unprecedented| power crisis strikes the country.

Local media say “unexpected” and “unprecedented” electricity cuts in the provinces of Jilin, Liaoning and Heilongjiang, were caused by power rationing during peak hours. Millions of homes in eastern China are now without power and factories have been forced to shut down too. Tech manufacturers in the eastern and southeastern coasts of the country, including Apple and Tesla, are said to be feeling the impacts. Apple Inc supplier Unimicron Technology Corp (UTC) has said that they have put a stop to production at three Chinese factories to comply with the new emission standards set by Xi Jinping’s government.



Making matters worse is said to be a coal shortage.

The lack of power has enraged the public and has also cause down shut downs to traffic lights and 3G mobile phone coverage in some areas.

A utility in Jilin also warned that the power shortages could disrupt water supplies at any time.

Chinese state broadcaster CCTV has also said a factory in Liaoning had to rush 23 workers to hospital as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning when ventilators suddenly stopped working during a blackout.

Goldman Sachs estimated that up to 44 percent of China’s industrial activity has been affected by power shortages.



Almost 60 percent of the Chinese economy is powered by coal, and the electricity crunch caused chaos amid disruptions to coal supplies due to the pandemic as well as a trade tiff with Australia.

Adam Ni, an analyst at China Neican, a think-tank, said local authorities were forced to resort to rationing as electricity prices remain capped in China.

He said: “So with rising input prices but fixed output prices, generating electricity has become less profitable – it may even become a loss-making venture.

“Since raising electricity prices may lead to more social discontent than rationing electricity, especially among households, the authorities have opted to restrict demand for electricity through rationing.”

As China seeks to enter the global commitment to tackling climate change by coming carbon neutral, it directed factories to curb production or bring down power usage in provinces such as Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Yunnan and Guangdong provinces.

Notices were sent to heavy industries to limit power usage during peak periods (between 7 am-11 pm) or shut down production for 2-3 days each week.

LINK
 

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Xi is demanding re-unification with Taiwan, We have an absent president, Kerry is telling the French that the president was not even aware that our diplomats were screwing France with the Submarine deal with the Ausies, General Flinn says there is a Government in place being run by Obama irrespective of who is president, we have real problems in Washington DC.
 

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This is just too comical until you realize China is actually planning to build 18 new blast furnace projects and 43 new coal-fired power plant units during the first half of the year to try and meet the new clean electricity demands.

I'm not sure what we are doing.
 

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Sounds like they're in a real pickle over there.

Why aren't the Chinese building more windmills/turbines and putting up more solar panels to meet the new clean electricity demands?
They probably looked up some facts instead of living in fairy tale land.

“The American Wind Energy Association says it takes about 230 tons of steel, more than a thousand tons of concrete and 45 tons of nonrecyclable plastic blades to make a single wind turbine; all with a life-cycle of around 20 years”.

Solar panels are even less efficient.
 

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They probably looked up some facts instead of living in fairy tale land.

“The American Wind Energy Association says it takes about 230 tons of steel, more than a thousand tons of concrete and 45 tons of nonrecyclable plastic blades to make a single wind turbine; all with a life-cycle of around 20 years”.

Solar panels are even less efficient.
Wait, can't they make more windmills, from other windmills, or solar-panels? Maybe water turbines?
 

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Xi is demanding re-unification with Taiwan, We have an absent president, Kerry is telling the French that the president was not even aware that our diplomats were screwing France with the Submarine deal with the Ausies, General Flinn says there is a Government in place being run by Obama irrespective of who is president, we have real problems in Washington DC.
The french screwed themselves with the submarine deal. They were given the contract in april 2016 and yet no work has been done and the price miraculously climbed to over $100 billion. We had problems with the french when building the new city to south east light rail in Sydney as well and so they have form in this regard lets just say. The british that are building the Hunter Class frigates are already cutting steel after having to build there new warehouse facilities beforehand and only receiving the contract in 2018.
 

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Sounds like they're in a real pickle over there.

Why aren't the Chinese building more windmills/turbines and putting up more solar panels to meet the new clean electricity demands?
Because they don't have access to Australian coal and iron ore anymore thanks to their own tariffs and bans on Australian products. China thought that would punish us but we just found new markets and at extremely higher prices which means that ironically we have been making money in this pandemic. China on the other hand is failing.
 

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F China. People are finally wising up to their tactics and moving businesses out of there. They better hope they don't actually decide to invade Taiwan. Then the whole world will turn against them.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
They probably looked up some facts instead of living in fairy tale land.

“The American Wind Energy Association says it takes about 230 tons of steel, more than a thousand tons of concrete and 45 tons of nonrecyclable plastic blades to make a single wind turbine; all with a life-cycle of around 20 years”.

Solar panels are even less efficient.
UK has invested heavily in wind farms are heavily reliant on them, the UK had a record number of still windless days with no wind in 2021 (Not the smelly sort), which mean't that electric power delivery has been poor. I think the have to operate between 7 MPH to 55 MPH max to produce wind energy.


The U.K. went all in on wind power. Here’s what happens when it stops blowing
BY
SOPHIE MELLOR
September 16, 2021 10:59 AM GMT+1

The exponential growth of offshore wind farms in the North Sea has been a testament to the combined efforts of European countries’ investing time, effort, and money in the decarbonization of their electricity grids.

But just as Europe needs energy the most, the wind in the North Sea has stopped blowing, forcing regional energy markets to scramble for gas reserves to heat homes and power businesses.

This has had expensive consequences.

As the European energy market grows increasingly reliant on a renewable energy source that is cheap to harness and carbon-emission free—but is clearly unreliable when the wind isn’t blowing—surging electricity bills are an unintended consequence of the energy transition.

Dead calm
The situation is especially acute in the U.K., where wind is currently providing only 7% of the country’s energy makeup—a steep drop from the 25% it generated on average across 2020.

The U.K.’s offshore wind sector had been a success story of the energy transition, drastically cutting emissions by rolling out 24GW of wind power over the past decade—enough to power 7.2 million homes. But as wind slowed and the price of carbon credits rose to record highs, the electricity market has experienced extreme volatility.

“We have very steep targets for increased renewable energy penetration, and the growing problem alongside of that is this fluctuation in prices that we’re seeing,” says Finlay Clark, an offshore wind analyst from Wood Mackenzie.

As a result, gas- and coal-fired electricity plants have been brought online to fill the gap. Gas now makes up more than half of the electricity in the U.K., and while the U.K.’s offshore wind is covered by subsidies and operating at zero marginal cost, gas is not.

Heading into winter at a time when more energy is already needed to fuel economic recovery as the region emerges from the pandemic, European countries are setting aside quotas meant to cap carbon emissions and rethinking the shutdown of coal plants in order to fill the gap left by the missing wind.

Even coal, the most carbon-emitting energy source, has returned to the stage; it now accounts for 3% of the British energy makeup after a record-breaking two coal-free months. Faced with the power crunch last week, the electricity market operator National Grid asked EDF to restart the West Burton A coal power station in Nottinghamshire. But with a looming deadline to close all coal plants in the U.K. by 2024, this may not be an option in the future.

LINK
 
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Eh? There's a difference between actual reliable power day-to-day and night-to-night between wind-and-sun green purple haze dream lektrik production, and actual power plants that operate 24/7/365?????? o_O

Only an intellectual or a bureaucrat or someone who is detached from reality--perhaps I repeat myself--could think there's no difference. I am getting sick of saying/thinking "un freakin believable" so many times per day that I stopped keeping score.

Now, if chyyynnnaaa is so dadblamed smart, why don't they build some nuke plants? They take longer to design and build, and so a couple of them might blow up over the next 20 years or so, NO WORRIES!! Most of that radioactive cloud will drift across the Pacific and wipe out LA.
 

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Because they don't have access to Australian coal and iron ore anymore thanks to their own tariffs and bans on Australian products. China thought that would punish us but we just found new markets and at extremely higher prices which means that ironically we have been making money in this pandemic. China on the other hand is failing.
Glad to get an Australian perspective, what is the spat with the Chinese?
 

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F China. People are finally wising up to their tactics and moving businesses out of there. They better hope they don't actually decide to invade Taiwan. Then the whole world will turn against them.
The next best thing would be for the big box stores to follow suit and bail but then we would be seeing 🧐 price increases all over. BTW the Dollar Stores are having to start selling some things for over a buck. 🥶
 

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UK has invested heavily in wind farms are heavily reliant on them, the UK had a record number of still windless days with no wind in 2021 (Not the smelly sort), which mean't that electric power delivery has been poor. I think the have to operate between 7 MPH to 55 MPH max to produce wind energy.


The U.K. went all in on wind power. Here’s what happens when it stops blowing
BY
SOPHIE MELLOR
September 16, 2021 10:59 AM GMT+1

The exponential growth of offshore wind farms in the North Sea has been a testament to the combined efforts of European countries’ investing time, effort, and money in the decarbonization of their electricity grids.

But just as Europe needs energy the most, the wind in the North Sea has stopped blowing, forcing regional energy markets to scramble for gas reserves to heat homes and power businesses.

This has had expensive consequences.

As the European energy market grows increasingly reliant on a renewable energy source that is cheap to harness and carbon-emission free—but is clearly unreliable when the wind isn’t blowing—surging electricity bills are an unintended consequence of the energy transition.

Dead calm
The situation is especially acute in the U.K., where wind is currently providing only 7% of the country’s energy makeup—a steep drop from the 25% it generated on average across 2020.

The U.K.’s offshore wind sector had been a success story of the energy transition, drastically cutting emissions by rolling out 24GW of wind power over the past decade—enough to power 7.2 million homes. But as wind slowed and the price of carbon credits rose to record highs, the electricity market has experienced extreme volatility.

“We have very steep targets for increased renewable energy penetration, and the growing problem alongside of that is this fluctuation in prices that we’re seeing,” says Finlay Clark, an offshore wind analyst from Wood Mackenzie.

As a result, gas- and coal-fired electricity plants have been brought online to fill the gap. Gas now makes up more than half of the electricity in the U.K., and while the U.K.’s offshore wind is covered by subsidies and operating at zero marginal cost, gas is not.

Heading into winter at a time when more energy is already needed to fuel economic recovery as the region emerges from the pandemic, European countries are setting aside quotas meant to cap carbon emissions and rethinking the shutdown of coal plants in order to fill the gap left by the missing wind.

Even coal, the most carbon-emitting energy source, has returned to the stage; it now accounts for 3% of the British energy makeup after a record-breaking two coal-free months. Faced with the power crunch last week, the electricity market operator National Grid asked EDF to restart the West Burton A coal power station in Nottinghamshire. But with a looming deadline to close all coal plants in the U.K. by 2024, this may not be an option in the future.

LINK
Look at the bright side. The windmills might last 21 years instead of the average of 20. ;)
 

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Glad to get an Australian perspective, what is the spat with the Chinese?
It's the combination of a few things like when our government banned a Chinese Govt owned company from being involved in 5g projects and came to a head last year when our Prime Minister publicly called for an inquiry into the origins of COVID19. The CPP has since gone nuts banning different Aussie imports, officially & unofficially.
 
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