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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Adaptive headlights finally legal in US with Biden's infrastructure bill signed into law (msn.com)
November 16, 2021
Sean Szymkowski

Automotive tire Automotive lighting Hood Automotive design Automotive exterior


Here come the adaptive headlights. With Monday's signing ceremony for the bipartisan infrastructure bill, President Biden's pen stroke did more than unlock billions of dollars for infrastructure in the US. The law opens the door for the latest headlight technologies to finally hit the road here.

Adaptive headlights go by many different names, depending on which brand's touting their own tech, but Audi's Digital Matrix LED headlights are one of the better-known examples. What these headlights can do is automatically shut off certain clusters of LEDs while you're driving. Today, headlights in the US really just go from bright, to really bright when flicking on the high beams. Sure, automatic high beams are a thing, but adaptive headlights take things 10 steps further.

Say you're driving on a dark road off the highway and a car approaches from the opposite direction. The headlights see this, shut down the cluster of lights that would end up blinding the other driver in oncoming traffic and keep your lane completely lit with as much light as possible. The technology can do this for multiple cars, too, if different lanes.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Black GM still uses halogen bulbs in some models, never mind why they have not used these expensive adaptive units!

Just a good way to have to spend 5+ grand on the package for them imo. I just want bright headlamps that allow me to see the road and signs at night. Quality projectors and led lamps are all you need, if designed right will never blind oncoming cars because the cut off from the projectors wont allow it. This is just something that will add tons of cost to the purchase price and add tons of cost if god forbid it ever had an issue outside of your warranty.

People get blinded because of the people who try and retrofit led/hid bulbs into non projector housings imo. I usually never have an issue with newer cars or trucks blinding my vision at night, always the guy that put some ebay specials in his non projector lamp housings.
Once they are legal, I expect Cadillac to offer them as options. Many go ga-ga over lighting (I kind of like it), I remember when we had a thread on BMW's laser headlights, GMI was going nuts, as if you could blow up other cars with the headlights :D If people want to pay, GM should offer. Detroit in general was late in getting into higher end headlights vs. the Germans, hopefully they are on this adaptive lighting as soon as possible. The only downside is all the Euro vehicles already have them, they just need to ship them. I don't know which Cadillac's, if any, are set up for them and we might need to wait for the next gen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yeah. I had to do some research on it.
It looks like it’s still the matrix headlight system that’s available in the EU, just crippled in the US.
So, presumably, once the new law goes into effect, Audi can just update the system to incorporate full functionality.
I presume these lights are expensive and everyone who bought them in the USA basically gets nothing out of them except that they look cool and high tech? Wow.

I wonder if they'll be able to have the dealer to restore full functionality once they are legal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
By allowing adaptive headlights, which are almost always LED or Laser-based, both of which use less electricity and therefore increase range / use less gas which decreases the draw on the grid / need for fuel? As for how much of our money? Probably none for this part since it only removes a DOT rule disallowing adaptive headlights, in a sense it could save some manufacturers money because now they can just use one type of headlight as opposed to the "American headlight" and (their) domestic headlight. This part is a good thing. Even the whole part about planting trees in (poor, more ethnically diverse) neighborhoods actually saves a little money since the tress can lessen the heat load from the pavement, thereby lowering the temperature in the area which will then put less strain on the grid and is much cheaper than fortifying the grid in those areas. The bill is 2,701 pages so it's quite the task to get through, but there are a few good things in it.
Not to derail the thread, but I've seen the studies about the trees in the poorer sides of town. I'm all for trees and do believe they can save a decent amount of electricity. However, they leave out the cost - most of the treeless cityscapes have no place for trees, so they'd have to remove concrete and bring in suitable soil - that's got to use a lot of energy to do. And, in a city environment with a small square of dirt for the tree to grow in is never going to produce a big population of huge, shade giving tree like an oak or maple. They can plant dwarf trees that'll do well, but they won't have the shade impact of a big tree.

Little things they leave out. I believe in the theory but question the reality of implementing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I get that. I'm hoping they plant them in empty lots or something. I'm hopeful, not optimistic.

Sorry for the sidebar, wasn't trying to derail it. I edited my post to remove the "tree thing"
No issue here! It's a topic of interest for me! I like to garden/landscape and maintain my forests.
 
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