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Horsepower and torque aren’t everything when it comes to working with pickup trucks. Much of a truck’s life will be spent sitting still while being loaded and unloaded. So before we even mention the powertrain, let’s look at how the GMC Canyon works while it’s in park.

Starting with the business end of the pickup truck, the Canyon offers four permanent tie-down spots in the corners of the bed. They are nicely sized rings that are fully coated with the spray-in bedliner, making them durable and easy to access. Unfortunately, they are a little low in the bed and that can occasionally lead to them being tough to reach depending on what you’re packing back there.

There is a solution. GM offers optional tie-down rings that can be installed higher up to solve the problem, though unfortunately our tester doesn’t have them.

A set of four tie-down rings are available through the brand’s accessory program for $100, money that you will want to spend. These tie-downs have 13 different fitment positions available, most of which are high up the bed wall, making them versatile and ready to tackle just about any tie-down job. A ton of other accessories are also offered for the truck, ranging from a bike rack to a ladder rack

Loading up a pile of freight into the bed is made easy by GM’s bumper-mounted step, a simple and effective solution for easy bed access. The step is at a convenient height for most people and is always ready for use. Plus they give the rear end of the Canyon a look that I’m fond of.

The spray-in bedliner in our test Canyon has so far been durable and useful. Hauling a massive pile of scrap wood complete with nails left few if any marks in our truck’s bed, while the coarseness of the liner does a great job of holding everything in place. Our truck’s long-bed measures in at 6’ 2” and hasn’t left us wanting more.

Hooking up a trailer to this truck is also about as easy as it gets. The light hookups are located in a convenient spot, nestled in beside the license plate, while smart positioning of two small lights makes sure that you can see the light jacks at night. Safety chains are also trouble free to attach thanks to the Canyon’s easy-to-access hitch.

Out back, the Canyon accomplishes everything you’d want from a solid work truck. Interior hauling on the other hand isn’t as hassle free.

The back seats can be configured in two different forms for hauling cargo. The seat backs can flip down, creating a nearly flat load floor, or the seat bottoms can fold up, leaving a plastic bracket underneath. Both ways have merits and downsides. With the seat backs folded down, you have to lift whatever it is you are loading about 3-feet higher to get to the load floor, a feat that may not be so easy with heavy cargo.

On the flip side, folding the seat bottoms up leaves you with a partitioned storage area that is decent for smaller items, but would not work with larger stuff. In the Canyon’s larger twin the Sierra, the seat bottoms have no plastic structure underneath, so when folded up, the entire rear floor is accessible for packing full of stuff. It’s too bad the Canyon didn’t adopt that feature ...
For more on this update, 2015 GMC Canyon Long-Term Review: Truck Functions 101 please visit AutoGuide.com.
 

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I really like the looks of the Canyon, I agree that they really did well! As I think the full size pickups have gotten way to big, the Canyon seems perfect sized. Still seems like there is room for an even smaller truck.
there is a "training" VID posted of the 1982 S10 by test drive junkies
and GM points out the LOW 2 FT high floor height for easy/safe loading and a bumper step is NOT needed at all and think for a LOT that would be worth MORE then "baddass" tall 4WD looks and wonder if something more like the city express turned into a mini pick up (I know the city is a NISSAN)
the city express as a single cab truck would have a 6" box and a 18 inch lift over height and 1400 LBS payload and is 4 FT between wheel wells in box
 

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As someone who hauls my motorcycles to the race track on a regular basis and loads and unloads them by myself mainly, it's soooooooooooo nice to have a low bed. Most trucks these days are very, very far from that, especially full size trucks that I prefer to haul two bikes in plus equipment.
 

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There has already been a safety recall issued for the Canyon (and Colorado) regarding the driver air bag.

Why can't GM get it right when it comes to safety - especially a new model on a new platform?
Have you not noticed the change in policies? This is GM getting it right. They are recalling even potential issues to make sure they are addressed and not left hanging.
 

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There has already been a safety recall issued for the Canyon (and Colorado) regarding the driver air bag.

Why can't GM get it right when it comes to safety - especially a new model on a new platform?
I wouldn't get all shook up about that small recall. Have you noticed, all auto companies are having routine recalls lately?
It was a simple reprogam to fix the issue. Bag supplier wired the deployment stages opposite. They were reprogrammed to read them correctly. Only affected early build, like the first few weeks of production.
 

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There is no excuse for these to not have good reliability ratings right out of the gate. The drivetrain has been used several years with the 2.5 and the Global 3.6 has been around for quite a while with the timing chain issue hopefully well behind us. Don't skimp on these GM they are too important!
 
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