GM Inside News Forum banner
1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
2008 Chrysler Town and Country Touring (Signature Series)

It’s what’s on the inside that counts.

(56k WARNING: Lots of pictures after the first two sections!)



Introduction
Our family car has been a 2006 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer Edition (4.0L V6) for the last 2.5 years. We bought the SUV when our second child was born, and double strollers would not easily fit inside of our CTS. We wanted a car that could, in a pinch also carry 7 passengers, so the Explorer was the right fit at the time. It could carry 7 people with the third row (albeit with hardly any cargo capacity) and it wasn’t a minivan. We really hated minivans due to our experience with them when my wife was a nanny.

The Explorer was okay carrying six people, we had to do it in a pinch when grandparents travelled with us. But it wasn’t pleasant. We took a few road trips to Las Vegas, San Diego, and Monterey from Los Angeles. It was just bearable. But not too pleasant. Our son would sit in the third row, which we’d split (one seat would fold onto the floor so we could put luggage there), two adults would sit in the second row with our daughter in her child seat in the middle. The Explorer isn’t a very wide SUV, so the second row would be cramped and unpleasant.

The real problem however would manifest itself when my wife would have playdates, and other children would carpool with her and our two children. In the Explorer, there is no convenient way to get to the third row without folding one of the 60/40 split second row of seats. If you have carseats in the second row, this is going to be a real chore. And with both back rows filled with carseats, there’s pretty much nowhere to put strollers behind the third row.

There was also the problem of utility. The Explorer (despite it being a Sport Utility Vehicle) wasn’t all that great in this regard when passengers were in the second row. If, for instance I wanted to take a modestly sized LCD TV home from Costco (let’s say a 46” TV) it would be impossible without putting the second row down, and then only barely possible -- depending on the packaging the TV came in. Or, in the case of Home Depot runs, it often meant two trips -- one there with the family and then one back without them to purchase the items.

With talk of us possibly having a third child and observing all of these issues, we knew the Explorer was rapidly outliving its usefulness. With gas on its way to $4.00/gal we knew that the window of opportunity to trade in the Explorer and get a decent value for it was rapidly shrinking. Armed with that information, we started looking at possible replacements.

The Other Candidates
I have always liked GM’s Lambda crossover triplets (Outlook/Acadia/Enclave). They were high on the list as a replacement for the Explorer. Seeing them in real life however was a little bit of a disappointment. While there was MORE room behind the third row, there wasn’t as much more as I had hoped. The sliding/flipping seats in the second row wouldn’t work all that well with a carseat, and while you can get to the third row from the second with the captain’s chairs (not bench) it was still relatively hard for an adult to squeeze between the first and second row (especially with a car seat installed) to get into the third row to help a child into their seat. This is too bad, these are gorgeous (in the case of Enclave particularly) and well designed CUVs.

We briefly explored (har-har) the idea of a bigger Body On Frame SUV like the Tahoe or Expedition, but we didn’t entertain that idea all that much. Those trucks are much larger, thirstier (heavier and big V8s) and while they have much more cargo space than the Explorer, they can still be a pain to get to the third row. In the case of the GM SUVs (Tahoe/Yukon/Escalade) the third row didn’t even fold onto the floor!

So SUVs and CUVs were a bust. It wouldn’t be worth trading in the Explorer in our minds, just to get another SUV/CUV. They had many of the same problems that the Explorer did, and wasn’t worth taking the depreciation hit just to make our lives “a little bit” better.

Dial M for “Minivan”
So what was left? The “dreaded” minivan.

Considering their reputation for being mommy mobiles, we’ve avoided them. In addition, when my wife was a nanny, we had taken out her employers’ minivan (a Honda Odyssey circa 2001) a few times to run errands. We hated that thing. It was flimsy, hard to maneuver, and it left a lasting impression on us.

One of my coworkers had a previous generation Town and Country and was always raving about its usefulness. So, we decided to look at the new one that was recently redesigned (for the 2008 model year). I did my research on them and generally liked what I had seen. A reasonable price tag (well loaded for about $35,000) which was almost $3-6,000 cheaper than an equivalent Sienna or Odyssey. A wide variety of seating configurations, including the innovative Stow ‘n Go and the new Swivel ‘n Go. Three row entertainment options, and a list of features and comforts that were a mile long.

We decided to take a look at our local dealership. They had 8 vans on the lot. The first thing I wanted to look at was the Swivel ‘n Go optioned vans. I thought the idea was really cool, but the practicality was a little dubious. I could hardly get into the second row seat with the table up and the seat swiveled to look at the third row. Kids would probably fare better. But more concerning to me was that the Swivel seats could not fold into the floor like the Stow ‘n Go seats. This was a concern because they weigh 90lbs a piece, and are not the easiest to lug in and out. So, even though we thought the idea was really cool, we quickly eliminated it from consideration. Perhaps in the future when they come out with Swivel ‘n Stow ‘n Go we can consider it.




Stow 'n Go -- 2nd row seats up, 3rd row seats in the floor





Stow 'n Go - All Rows folded down into the floor


I will say this however, the Swivel ‘n Go seats are more comfortable than the Stow ‘n Go seats. This is not a problem for us, as children are going to be sitting in car seats and/or boosters for a few more years but if you plan on carrying adults for long trips in the second row, the Swivel ‘n Go seats may be worthy of consideration. That said, the Stow ‘n Go seats are not bad.



The Tailgating mode of the third row could be fun!

Okay, so we figured out our seating configuration. Now to look over the rest of the van. My God, this thing is huge inside. Behind the third row is a cavernous hole that dwarves the cargo area of any 3rd row SUV we looked at. You could easily put two double strollers standing up in that cavern! Maybe three depending on the model of stroller. We knew immediately that our cargo problems had been solved. Inside, we had no problems walking (hunched over yes, but still -- walking, not crawling) between the second row seats to get to the third row. Once in the third row, we discovered ample leg room for adults. The second row seemed to have more leg room than my folks’ Mercedes S500. Seriously. And since the second row slides, sliding the seats forward made the third row more than comfortable enough for average sized adults like myself (5’8”).



Storage space behind the third row. It goes deep into the floor.


When the second row isn’t stowed in the ground, there is a cavernous stowage compartment where the seats would go. We thought it would be an ideal place to put diapers, store water bottles from Costco, and so forth without using up any of the cargo room behind the third row. This sort of utility is completely unmatched by any SUV or CUV on the market.


Storage in Stow 'n Go compartment when seats are upright.


And then here come the sliding doors. With the press of a button in the van (or a double click of a button on the key fob) the doors slide open. Brilliant. The rear hatch also can be opened from either inside the van or the key fob if need be. This means that you can open up the van completely, have the kids run inside and load groceries all without exerting yourself. With the remote start ability, you could have your van start while heading out of the store and get the interior comfortable.


Oh, the joy of having power sliding doors!




Sliding Doors also have integrated sunscreens.




As do the third row seats.



Speaking of the key fob, it is one of the new generation integrated key/fob units much like luxury cars come equipped with.


Key/Integrated Fob includes Remote Start, Ability to open Sliding Doors and Liftgate




At night the interior lights up like an airplane.

Then come the entertainment options. With the Signature Series, you get the Dual DVD player standard, along with Navigation, Sirius Satellite Radio, Backup Camera/Sensors, and the MyGig system. You can literally have each row watch their own movie! Now when taking adults and children on long road trips (like we have done before with grandparents), the adults can watch one thing and the children can watch something else. Headphones and a DVD remote are included with the van.


Dual DVD Screens (one for each row, and when the vehicle is in Park, you can watch either DVD being played on the navigation screen)


Two wireless headphones and a DVD Remote are included with the van (only 1 headphone pictured)

Sirius radio comes free for one year. Sirius TV is available on some vans, but ours didn’t come equipped with it. 3 channels of Television programming (children’s programming) are currently available. We have more than enough DVDs for road trips, so that television is not a big concern.


Sirius Satellite Radio is included for 1 year with the van.


MyGig with Backup Camera Option


MyGig with Navigation


The van is available with three engine options: The 3.3L V6 (175hp), the 3.8L V6 (197hp), and the new (at least for the vans) 4.0L V6 (251hp). A big problem with the 4.0L V6 is that it is only available with the Limited trim level vans. Which would bump up the price of the van almost $5,000 because the Signature Series is only available on the Touring trim. So, that immediately put it out of consideration for ourselves. All engines besides the 3.3L come with a 6 speed automatic (the 3.3L V6 is only available with a 4 speed). So, we are stuck with the 3.8L V6. Which was a concern of mine, because I didn’t want anything that was slower than the Explorer, which I felt was marginal at times. My daily driver is a supercharged Mustang GT, so I may not be the best judge of this, but even my wife has commented at times at how the Explorer didn’t have much
‘oomph’ at speed when loaded with passengers. The 4.0L SOHC unit in the Explorer made 210hp, so it started out with the hp advantage. It also was a SOHC unit, whereas the 3.8L in the Chrysler is a pushrod engine. Which made me a little leery about top end pull. In the van’s advantage however was the fact that it had an extra gear (the Explorer was a 5 speed).

Test driving the van, made it seem more spirited than the 4.0L SOHC V6 Explorer. The transmission seemed perfectly mated to the engine, keeping it in the powerband at all time. The Explorer tended to feel ‘raspy’ in the upper RPM band, whereas the van felt smoother. It’s not the most sophisticated engine in the world (nor the best sounding), but it does the job. After break-in I expect it to do even better.

So that was a big relief!


Dash mounted shifter with manual shifting in 'D' position

To my eye, the previous generation minivans looked a little better from the exterior than the new ones do. It’s growing on my slowly, and I no longer think they’re ugly -- but I don’t think they’ll ever look handsome. But then, all of the current minivans look pretty ugly. That’s okay, because their primary purpose is to keep their owners and precious cargo (children) happy. And at that, these minivans do quite well.

The Interior
I must say that I actually like the interior design. We don’t have the up-level interior found in the Limited (suede seat inserts, nicer wood trim, etc...) but the design of the interior is not bad at all. The problem is with the material quality. Which is really strange when you look at the mix of materials used. The headliner for instance is as nice as the CTS we owned (model year 2004). And the grab handles are nice. The areas that you rest your arms on are nice and soft touch. But the large expanse of dashboard is some of the hardest (and thinnest) plastic I’ve seen in a vehicle. While not as bad as the SRT-4 Neon that I had, it isn’t up to the standard of what should be in a Chrysler.


This is our mid-level Touring Interior, we do not have the Limited which has more wood and nicer leather on the seats.



Our Stow 'n Go seats are not as nice as the Swivel 'n Go seats, but they are still comfortable
.

That said, we do not make it a point to fondle or grope our dashboard on a regular basis, and when taking into account the MSRP for the vehicle (approx $3-5,000 cheaper than a comparably equipped Honda or Toyota) it doesn’t disturb us too much.

Reliability concerns
We were a little concerned about reliability. The previous generation vans were known for their weak transmissions that would go out (the previous 4 speed) around 100,000 miles. These vans are still a Chrysler when all is said and done. Chrysler hasn’t made the huge leaps and bounds that Ford and GM have made in reliability, and you still hear about some problems with them. Fortunately Chrysler has a lifetime powertrain warranty. In addition, for around $2,000 you can get a Chrysler lifetime bumper-to-bumper warranty. Looking at all of the electronics (dual power sliding doors, liftgate, dual dvd players, MyGig (with an integrated Hard Drive!), Backup Camera, etc...) I felt that would be a worthwhile investment. We plan on keeping this van for a long time! Every 5 years you have to have the van inspected at a Dodge/Chrysler dealership (for free) in order to maintain your lifetime warranties.

We purchased the van that day, said our tearful goodbyes to the Explorer (we only had fond memories of it, sadly we had just outgrown it as a family) and my wife drove the van home.

Issues
By the time we finished purchasing the van, it was 9pm. So delivery was a little rushed. We did notice some overspray of paint on some of the black plastic surfaces, and a scratch on an interior door handle.

If the van is parked in a steep incline, the power doors appear to think there is an obstruction and will refuse to open -- at which point you will have to open the doors manually. There may be a way to adjust this sensitivity at the dealership, and we intend to find out. It’s happened once when parked at the very bottom section of our driveway (which is slightly steep).

That’s been it. We haven’t had a chance to get back to the dealership with these issues, but we intend to bring them up when we have a chance.

Life with a minivan
Living with a minivan is actually more relaxing than the SUV. It’s also easier on your back! We’ve purchased some large area rugs for our floors with the kids still in the car (folding down the third row makes the rear of the van cavernous). We were almost able to fit a 52” XBR4 Sony LCD TV into the rear with the second row up. If we had another inch or two of travel in the second row sliding seats, it would have swallowed it up. If I had twine, I would have just tied down the liftgate. Darn!


An integrated rechargeable flashlight in the back of the van makes finding stuff in the dark easy.


Unfortunately I had to come back. I thought it would be a good test of the Stow ‘n Go seats anyway, so I folded them into the ground. Going back for the TV, I could have bought the TV and a cabinet for it, and still had ample room in the van.

This is far more utility than we would have ever gotten from our Explorer.

My wife took a friend and her two children (car seats and all) with them to the beach two weeks after purchasing the van. All of the beach umbrellas, backpacks, sand toys, chairs easily fit into the van along with 4 children and two adults. Everyone was very comfortable, DVDs were watched and the kids had a great time. My wife commented on how much easier the van drove than the Explorer when loaded down with people and gear, and going up the hills of Kanan Dume road.


Driver's information center showing Tire Pressure. It can also display an assorted amount of information. The Nav system also hooks into it when turns are imminent. In addition, radio information/track information shows up as well.

One area of concern is towing. The kids are getting old enough now to start camping, and it would be nice to take a trailer with us. Our van has the towing prep package (oil/tranny coolers, rear leveling suspension -- but no actual hitch) and is rated for 3,500lbs. With our gear, we are probably at the edge of comfort with a popup trailer. The Explorer was rated to tow more (5,000lbs), but with only the V6 unit, it probably wouldn’t be very fun either. We’ll do some more research on this, these vans are new and there isn’t much owner feedback on towing yet.


Each passenger in the van has their own LED pinpoint light for reading. These lights are tightly focused, and are not a distraction for the driver.

Conclusion
I feel that this is the best minivan ever made by the Chrysler Corp. Yes, it does have some drawbacks compared to its Japanese competitors in terms of materials quality and powertrain options. But, Chrysler has upped the bar once again in terms of innovative storage, seating and entertainment solutions. While the Japanese vans continue to refine, Chrysler continues to innovate. Chrysler needs to work on the refinement aspect of the vans, and they will be in good shape. Similarly, I look forward to seeing some interesting innovations in the next-generation Honda and Toyota vans. Fierce competition benefits us all. Maybe they will make the Swivel ‘n Go style seating option work better. Or maybe Chrysler will beat them to the punch with swiveling and stow-able seats. Time will tell.


There's storage everywhere!

For us the price of the Chrysler vans and the standard electronic goodies in the Signature Series vans sealed the deal. And no SUV/CUV comes close to the utility aspect of these vans.

The bottom line is that I look forward to family outings in the van. Everyone has a great time, and my wife and kids are happy. Life is more relaxing, and we can spend a few days on the road with this van without getting on each others’ nerves.


Flip down "conversation-mirror" (euphemism for 'yelling-mirror' no doubt) means that you can keep tabs on the little ones without having to turn around.


2 prong AC outlet thanks to built in inverter. Two AUX inputs for game systems or other AV input.


I am eagerly looking forward to our first road trip!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,898 Posts
man o man, after reading that I fuggin want one :D. Like an Escalade, if it had a bathroom, you could live pretty well in it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,390 Posts
I want one of these. I have always been a sucker for the T&C.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,569 Posts
What's the 0-60 on this rod?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,635 Posts
Nice van, but question, does the dash mounted shifter bother you at all. I have never understood this design and am wondering if you see any benefits of it being on the dash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It doesn't bother me really. You don't interact with it much, and it's not in your way like the ones in the Odyssey/Sienna which is mounted to the left of the audio/HVAC controls. Now that design irks the heck out of me!

I think the rationale is this: Most of the women I know that want a minivan don't like column mounted shifters. They think it is a pickup truck. That's why my mom didn't want an Escalade -- thanks to the column mounted shifter.

And of course a floor mounted shifter eats up room -- and minivans are supposed to be spacious.

I think it works okay. I don't use the manumatic feature all that much (other than perhaps to hold a gear going downhill), so it doesn't make much of a difference for me. My wife likes it though :)

Nice van, but question, does the dash mounted shifter bother you at all. I have never understood this design and am wondering if you see any benefits of it being on the dash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
LOL. I think the 4.0L V6 is around 8.0 flat. This thing is about 8.5 seconds from what I have "gathered". It is peppy, thanks to a steep first gear around town (city driving is terrific in this). The 6 speed transmission really helps change the demeanor of the 3.8L V6.

What's the 0-60 on this rod?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My wife had the same reaction! My coworker and I were coming up with hilarious names for a Chrysler seating system that had integrated potty seats.

Potty 'n Go
Go 'n Go
Pee 'n Go
etc...

It went downhill from there... :D

man o man, after reading that I fuggin want one :D. Like an Escalade, if it had a bathroom, you could live pretty well in it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
If fit, finish and quality were good to excellent, the T&C would own all. It is a nice van and the design has grown on me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,635 Posts
It doesn't bother me really. You don't interact with it much, and it's not in your way like the ones in the Odyssey/Sienna which is mounted to the left of the audio/HVAC controls. Now that design irks the heck out of me!

I think the rationale is this: Most of the women I know that want a minivan don't like column mounted shifters. They think it is a pickup truck. That's why my mom didn't want an Escalade -- thanks to the column mounted shifter.

And of course a floor mounted shifter eats up room -- and minivans are supposed to be spacious.

I think it works okay. I don't use the manumatic feature all that much (other than perhaps to hold a gear going downhill), so it doesn't make much of a difference for me. My wife likes it though :)
I will never understand women, lol. :lmao:

Seems a column shifter would make much more sense , but, I am not a woman (thank god :yup:).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,424 Posts
That was a great review and enjoyable read. The utility aspect of minivans should never be underestimated......especially when 'Sport Utility Vehicles' lack any semblance of sport or utility (unless towing is a concern....)

Inside my dad's std. length '94 Voyager, I've crammed a futon, 27" TV, full sized computer tower, luggage and boxes full of stuff........and the 3.3L under the hood has still pulled like a champ.

We need more minivans (and station wagons) on the road IMO.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,170 Posts
A minivan is simply the ultimate expression of putting utility ahead of everything else. There is nothing right or wrong about it, its a choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I am one of those people who firmly believes in, "drive what you want". I'm not going to start an argument of "there's no need for the average person to drive so and so". Going down that path leads to misery in general.

That said, it is a little unfair to say that minivans are all about utility, and to the detriment of everything else.

  • They drive better than most SUVs, handle better than most of them too.
  • They are more comfortable inside than almost any other car.
  • They get pretty good mpg, more like a large FWD car.
  • And to be honest, one element of utility -- towing, they are not as good as even a small sized BOF SUV like the Explorer.

And of course, a choice could be right or wrong. If I got a Corvette, I'd have made the wrong choice for my family. But perhaps the right choice for myself :lmao:

A minivan is simply the ultimate expression of putting utility ahead of everything else. There is nothing right or wrong about it, its a choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks! :) One reason I wrote it is that there is not too much information online about these vans, and the professional reviews all seem to be 'canned' and pretty much a read from the Chrysler spec sheet.

I think that the Town & Country is a 'cool' minivan if there ever was one. But it's all about interior comfort while doing the things that families do. It's basically a limo for your family.

And I think that's 'cool'.

As for utility, I completely agree! Nothing beats the minivan!

And as for image consciousness, that seems to be what holds minivans back right now. Which is kinda surprising considering the number of Camrys I see on the road :lmao:

That was a great review and enjoyable read. The utility aspect of minivans should never be underestimated......especially when 'Sport Utility Vehicles' lack any semblance of sport or utility (unless towing is a concern....)

Inside my dad's std. length '94 Voyager, I've crammed a futon, 27" TV, full sized computer tower, luggage and boxes full of stuff........and the 3.3L under the hood has still pulled like a champ.

We need more minivans (and station wagons) on the road IMO.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,671 Posts
Great review. I personally would not have even looked at a Chrysler van in the past, due to various things, but this new one seems to be breaking the mold again and has tons of features that CUV/SUVs can do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,170 Posts
I am one of those people who firmly believes in, "drive what you want". I'm not going to start an argument of "there's no need for the average person to drive so and so". Going down that path leads to misery in general.

That said, it is a little unfair to say that minivans are all about utility, and to the detriment of everything else.

  • They drive better than most SUVs, handle better than most of them too.
  • They are more comfortable inside than almost any other car.
  • They get pretty good mpg, more like a large FWD car.
  • And to be honest, one element of utility -- towing, they are not as good as even a small sized BOF SUV like the Explorer.

And of course, a choice could be right or wrong. If I got a Corvette, I'd have made the wrong choice for my family. But perhaps the right choice for myself :lmao:
Basically I disagree with most of this. Crossovers handle better, ride more comfortably, in some cases get better mileage. For many people, the lambdas are minivan killers. Most SUVs in my experience handle better than the average van. Also, SUVs and crossovers are available as luxury or near luxury vehicles from the factory that are more comfortable.

Now granted, all this is more expensive. So - I maintain. If utility (except towing) is what one is looking for over all else, then a van is the best choice. For me, the ability to occasionally load a 4x8, or occasionally carry 7 people is best served by a large crossover. To each his own.

Thats an interesting question though? Why are there no luxury minivans? I can't think of another class of vehicle that doesn't have a luxury version.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The lower Center of Gravity of a minivan tend to give it more stable cornering than most SUVs. It certainly handles better than my Explorer. I don't recall there being major roll over warnings for minivans like there were with SUVs.

The Town and Country is a near luxury vehicle. I'm not sure what you think it's missing. It is more comfortable than most SUVs I've ever ridden in. And with the Swivel 'n Go seats in the 2nd row, it is quite plush in Limited Trim.

I suggest you give one a test drive. Certainly not everyone needs the utility that a minivan provides. And a Lambda is certainly going to be more stylish.

But if you have a family, especially with toddlers or infants, a minivan is probably the most practical choice.

Basically I disagree with most of this. Crossovers handle better, ride more comfortably, in some cases get better mileage. For many people, the lambdas are minivan killers. Most SUVs in my experience handle better than the average van. Also, SUVs and crossovers are available as luxury or near luxury vehicles from the factory that are more comfortable.

Now granted, all this is more expensive. So - I maintain. If utility (except towing) is what one is looking for over all else, then a van is the best choice. For me, the ability to occasionally load a 4x8, or occasionally carry 7 people is best served by a large crossover. To each his own.

Thats an interesting question though? Why are there no luxury minivans? I can't think of another class of vehicle that doesn't have a luxury version.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,170 Posts
The lower Center of Gravity of a minivan tend to give it more stable cornering than most SUVs. It certainly handles better than my Explorer. I don't recall there being major roll over warnings for minivans like there were with SUVs.

The Town and Country is a near luxury vehicle. I'm not sure what you think it's missing. It is more comfortable than most SUVs I've ever ridden in. And with the Swivel 'n Go seats in the 2nd row, it is quite plush in Limited Trim.

I suggest you give one a test drive. Certainly not everyone needs the utility that a minivan provides. And a Lambda is certainly going to be more stylish.

But if you have a family, especially with toddlers or infants, a minivan is probably the most practical choice.
Most SUVs handle better than the Explorer, or TB for that matter.

I've spent time in the new minivan. Its slick packaging. It had the swivel seats, neat idea, but not enough van width to really shine. It was very comfortable, but the unibody flexes around corners - a common minivan problem, engine (also 4.0L) was no 3.6 HF in the NVH department. I thought the new Suburban I was in earlier rode as well and flexed less.

As far as luxury, its as luxury as a Chevy, or Toyota - even in Limited trim - what I was in. Its no Enclave, or Acura - let alone the top tier luxury marquees.

Like you said, 2 kids, an active home depot charge card, and a need for MSRP under 35K - a fantastic choice. Even good for the environment and at the pump given what it gives you. But lets not take it too far. Its still a choice of utility over luxury, refinement, and style.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,579 Posts
Basically I disagree with most of this. Crossovers handle better, ride more comfortably, in some cases get better mileage
Umm, do they? Even if, it might pertain to American crossovers vs. American minivans - with the Chrysler minivan being the only one left, and being developed by a company fighting for their life, you can't expect much vs. GM's "flagship" vehicles. I'd dare the Lambdas to take on the Renault Espace or Ford Galaxy, though.
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top