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http://www.speedtv.com/programs/101-cars-you-must-drive/

From the slightly silly to the totally awesome, comedian Alonzo Bodden takes you for an irreverent spin in 101 cars that have made history. Hop in the driver’s seat as the Last Comic Standing winner and former stealth fighter mechanic experiences these amazing cars in all their glory. It’s the good, the bad and the unexpected. Don’t miss a single hilarious minute of this new SPEED series.

101 Cars: Studebaker Golden Hawk

Like American Motors during the 1960s and 1970s, Studebaker was always a company that had to do more with less. While Chevrolet introduced its two-seater Corvette in 1953, and Ford came to market with the Thunderbird in 1955, Studebaker couldn't afford its own two-seat convertible. So it took an approach similar to what Chrysler did in creating the 300, packing more power and luxury touches into its sportiest coupe body style. The result was the Golden Hawk. The first cars had a 352-cubic-inch Packard V-8, (the two floundering companies were partners by then), while the 1957 and 1968 got Stude's own supercharged V-8. What the Hawk had going for it was it was lower slung and lighter than the big cars produced by Detroit's Big Three, so it was a good performer for its time. The Golden Hawk, and Packard for that matter, disappeared in 1959

100 Cars: Plymouth Superbird


If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Plymouth was really impressed by the 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona. Build as a direct response to the aerodynamic Ford and Mercury NASCAR racers, the Daytona had a bullett nose, convex rear window, and a towering rear wing. It owned NASCAR late in the 1969 season. Plymouth borrowed Dodge's data to make the Road Runner just as slippery. But making a "Superbird" wasn't all that easy. The Road Runner's fenders didn't align well to a nose cone, so Plymouth engineers adapted those from the 1970 Dodge Coronet. Radiator ducting differed to avoid the Daytona's engine-overheating problems, and the rear wing was swept further back. Like the Charger 500 and Daytona, the Superbird's conversion was by Creative Industries, who had to crank out 1,920 cars, one for every dealer, to meet NASCAR's latest homologation rules. Whatever, the Superbird did what it was supposed to - lure Richard Petty back to Plymouth and make Plymouth competitive in NASCAR. Imitation just wasn't quite enough for Plymouth, however, as Bobby Isaac won the driver's championship... in a Daytona

99 Cars: Ford Thunderbird

You can't do a book about iconic cars without including the original, two-seat "Baby Birds." Volumes have been written about them, and with good reason. Not because they were any sort of technical marvel - far from it, really - but they wore a million jigawatts of style, and did so when America was primed for something fun. The original T-Bird wasn't a sports car, but it was damned sporty. It wasn't a luxury car, but there was a lushness about it. It spoke of youth and the freedom of the American road, and it had a look and proportion that captured the fancy of American car lovers. It has never let go. The first-generation T-Birds have appeared in countless movies and television shows, inspired their own Beach Boys song, were raced with moderate success, and have been customized and canonized. There's even a U.S. postage stamp dedicated to them. They didn't sell all that well at the time, but just as the car was remodeled into a four-seater for 1958, people recognized the original as an instant classic, and it has remained so since. The driving position is strange: the seat is low (or the floor is high), and the huge steering wheel feels close to your chest. The dash and instruments are nicely detailed, but there's a terrible blind spot with the hardtop in place, hence the porthole window that appeared for 1956. The Ford Y-block engine was never the performance match of the new-for-'55 small-block Chevy, but it ran well enough considering the T-Bird's mission in life as a cruise bomb. Don't expect sports car handling either, as the drum brakes were barely adequate, and the two-speed automatic dimmed what power the engine put out. But it didn't matter: the idea was to drape either your left arm on the driver's door or your right arm around your honey, and just cruise. What's the hurry? The dual four-barrel carb models (called E-Code) and the rare, 300-horsepower Paxton-supercharged model (logically enough, the F-Code) are rare and highly collectible; it's just a question as to the extent and for what price. Ford tried to re-create the Thunderbird's original magic with a faithful yet modern "retrofuturistic" T-Bird redux from 2002 to 2005, but once the initial demand was filled, sales lagged, and the Bird went back into hibernation. Some things are just best left in their own time.
 

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maybe I'll have to watch this...number 97 or whatever, the Chrysler Turbine, is on my personal list
 
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