Inside the 2013 F12 - Technical Report

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Thread: Inside the 2013 F12 - Technical Report

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    Inside the 2013 F12 - Technical Report

    Inside the F12 - Technical Report
    Find out how Ferrari met all of the governmental regulations and environmental rules with their new F12berlinetta while making sure there was still plenty of emozione.
    By Andrew English / Photos by Wolfango Spaccarelli
    September 14, 2012
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    Almost a quarter century after the late Enzo Ferrari breathed the last instructions he’d give to his road-car engineers—con emozioneor “with emotion”—the game’s moved on. Now that government regs and environmental concerns have put an end to merely making the loudest, fastest and baddest big boy on the block, Roberto Fedeli, Ferrari’s technical director, must meet all the rules while making sure there’s still plenty of emozione. Here’s how he—and his team—did it.
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    Powertrain
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    While the engine shares much of its architecture with last year’s FF, the F12 has 12 percent more horsepower. That may not sound like much, but when you’re starting at 651, every extra bhp is a herculean effort. Still a short-stroke design—the bore/stroke ratio is 1.25, like a race engine—the motor’s designed to rev. Peak power hits at 8250 rpm, the 509 lb.-ft. torque peak occurs at 6000 rpm, and the unit will scream up to 8700 rpm before calling time. And let us reassure you, the sound is simply fantastic.
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    Body and Chassis
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    With its all-aluminum construction, the new F12 uses some of the insights gained from the company’s research program into different alloys. The 12 different aluminum recipes are joined by welds, glue, or rivets, and the result is a 110-lb. weight savings over the outgoing 599 model. The structure is also stiffer and safer in a crash.
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    The structure has been pinched and pulled so that the engine sits lower and more rearward, resulting in an improved front/rear weight distribution of 46/54. The overall length is about 2 in. shorter than the 599, but the front overhang has grown by 2.6 in. to allow for larger radiators.
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    Brakes
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    As is the norm for supercars these days, the Brakes are carbon-ceramic units that are about 20 lb. lighter than conventional iron discs. They’re pricey too—accidently drop and crack one, which we’ve heard isn’t hard to do, and replacements run at least $5000.
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    Brake Cooling Duct
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    The front brakes are cooled via active Vents in the grille, which open and close according to the temperature of the rotors.
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    The Aero Hood
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    The Hood has several interesting aerodynamic innovations including “Air Bridge,” a method of channeling high-pressure air at the base of the windshield and reducing drag. Air rushing off the hood flows into channels that direct the flow under a cast bridge on the top of the front fenders and then alongside the body, creating an aerodynamic boundary layer that reduces turbulence and drag. Ferrari has clearly done it right: Downforce has been increased by 76 percent over the 599, and the drag coefficient is still a relatively slippery 0.299.
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    Road&Track
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    Last edited by Quest; 09-20-2012 at 09:58 PM. Reason: added 2nd vid
    Any rigidity by an automobile manufacturer, no matter how large or how well established, is severely penalized in the market.
    -Alfred P. Sloan Jr. (1965) My Years with General Motors.

    Longitudinal powertrain Audi vehicles with quattro are indistinguishable from RWD vehicles with Full-Time AWD; both meet the criteria to be labeled RWD/AWD - to argue otherwise is a “logical fallacy” (argumentum ad logicam). Hidden Content

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    Re: Inside the 2013 F12 - Technical Report

    Ultimate Fantasy 1: 2013 Ferrari F12 Berlinetta (excerpts)
    November, 2012 issue / By Jason Cammisa
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    The first thing we're told about the 599GTB Fiorano's replacement is that one of the primary objectives was to make it more fun to drive at subfelonious speeds.
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    That's certainly a corse correction -- Ferrari has pulled off the proverbial racetrack early to ensure that the car is involving to drive on public roads, where its customers routinely find themselves. Ferrari's first step was to shrink the car: the F12 is 1.9 inches shorter, 0.7 inch narrower, and a very significant 2.5 inches lower than the 599 it replaces, but it doesn't sacrifice interior room or trunk space. To accomplish the latter, the F12 switches to a hatchback rear end, and the height reduction is made possible by mounting the engine 2.0 inches lower, a change that results in a dramatic 1.2-inch drop in the car's center of gravity.
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    Then there's the steering. Just as German automakers start to compromise their sports cars (#Porsche911) with feel-free electric power assist that saves only a marginal amount of fuel, Ferrari maintains that steering feel is far too important to risk. When, at lunch, the Ferrari boss asked what we liked best about the new car, we didn't hesitate: the steering.
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    The F12's steering might be featherlight, but it offers the best feel this side of an unassisted Lotus Elise. On-center feedback is ever-present, and with just two turns lock-to-lock, the ratio is so fast you'll almost never need to move your hands off of the nine- and three-o'clock positions. In the rare event that the F12 understeers, the wheel will go limp in your hands. When (not if) the rear end comes around because you've asked for way too much power in a corner, the wheel will dance in the direction of countersteer. This is a car you could drift blindfolded. Porsche's steering engineers should order an F12 right now.
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    The front-mounted V-12 is a modified version of the direct-injected 6262-cc monster that debuted in last year's FF. With a much higher compression ratio (13.5:1 versus 12.3:1), freer-flowing intake and exhaust, and more aggressive cams, it shoots 731 hp down the driveshaft. The massively oversquare (bore is 94.0 millimeters, stroke is only 75.2) twelve-cylinder responds instantly to throttle inputs, spinning like a drug-fueled Tasmanian devil from idle to its 8700-rpm redline and making the best V-12 noises in the business.
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    The Getrag seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transaxle has gotten better with time. It provides instant response to commands with shift times that are, for all intents and purposes, zero. The F12's computers will play tricks to cut power briefly under full-throttle shifts, giving a glorious exhaust bark on upshifts, although Ferrari still hasn't figured out that a driver who slams the pedal to the floor in automatic mode actually expects full acceleration. To extract all of the F12's performance, you'll have to use the steering-column-mounted paddles.
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    The F12 is the first V-12 Ferrari to use the E-Diff electronic locking rear differential, and it's nearly magical in its ability to put power to the ground. Mechanical grip is aided by a rear-biased weight distribution (54 percent of the F12's weight is on the rear axle), a five-link rear suspension (the 599 used control arms), and enormous Michelin Pilot Super Sport tires (315/35s at the rear, 255/35s in front, all on twenty-inch wheels). Still, successfully getting 731 horses to the ground in first gear is no small feat -- although the F12 can do it with surprising ease -- and it results in a 3.1-second factory-claimed 0-to-62-mph time. Seventh is just long enough to reach the F12's 211-mph top speed -- there is no extralong cruising gear, and yet the F12 still manages to sip 30 percent less fuel than the 599.
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    The F12 corners so go-kart-flat that you'd swear there's no suspension travel at all, except that the photos show a significant amount of body roll and the ride is appropriately compliant over bumpy pavement. Credit the computer-controlled magnetorheological suspension for all of the above. The new Ferrari is no McLaren MP4-12C magic carpet in the ride department, but it's never harsh, never unduly firm, and always comfortable -- unlike a certain bucking bull from Sant'Agata.
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    Neither midcorner bumps nor straight-line jumps seem to faze it, either. Driven in anger, the newest Ferrari handles like a formula car, almost always perfectly neutral with a slight tendency toward oversteer. Since all of the large masses are well within the wheelbase and since so much of the weight resides in the rear, it rotates more like a mid-engine sports car than a front-engine GT, turning in instantly and rotating on an axis right at the driver's spine.
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    That said, the F12 is aerodynamically advanced, with both a low coefficient of drag (0.30) and as much downforce as you're likely to see in a road car (a claimed 271 pounds at 124 mph). Some of the downforce comes from the Aero Bridge, a novel aerodynamic device you might not have noticed. Look closely at the photos and you'll see that part of the upper Front Fender has been removed, creating a tunnel that allows air to flow across the hood, out to the side, and along the door, creating downforce in the process. This is a whole new visual form -- removing body bulk for aero when, conventionally, designers have added wings, spoilers, splitters, and diffusers.
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    Many supercars are special by virtue of their looks, their sound, their price, and their speed, but this is a Ferrari that, even in the absence of the brand's mystique, is genuinely one of the world's greatest cars. As such, the F12 Berlinetta resides at the intersection of fantasy and reality.
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    2013 Ferrari F12 Berlinetta
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    BASE PRICE $330,000 (est.)
    ENGINE 48-valve DOHC V-12
    DISPLACEMENT 6.3 liters (382 cu in)
    POWER 731 hp @ 8250 rpm
    TORQUE 509 lb-ft @ 6000 rpm
    TRANSMISSION 7-speed automatic
    DRIVE Rear-wheel
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    CHASSIS
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    STEERING Hydraulically assisted
    SUSPENSION, FRONT Control arms, coil springs
    SUSPENSION, REAR Multilink, coil springs
    BRAKES Vented carbon-ceramic discs, ABS
    TIRES Michelin Pilot Super Sport
    TIRE SIZE f, r 255/35YR-20, 315/35YR-20
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    MEASUREMENTS
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    L x W x H181.8 x 76.5 x 50.1 in
    WHEELBASE 107.1 in
    TRACK F/R 65.6/63.7 in
    WEIGHT 3594 lb
    FUEL MILEAGE 13/18 mpg (est.)
    0-62 mph 3.1 sec
    TOP SPEED 211 mph
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    Automobile
    Last edited by Quest; 09-24-2012 at 12:53 PM.
    Any rigidity by an automobile manufacturer, no matter how large or how well established, is severely penalized in the market.
    -Alfred P. Sloan Jr. (1965) My Years with General Motors.

    Longitudinal powertrain Audi vehicles with quattro are indistinguishable from RWD vehicles with Full-Time AWD; both meet the criteria to be labeled RWD/AWD - to argue otherwise is a “logical fallacy” (argumentum ad logicam). Hidden Content

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    Re: Inside the 2013 F12 - Technical Report

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    Ferrai F12 berlinetta intro (Ferrari Corporate)
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    Ferrai F12 berlinetta indepth (Ferrari Corporate)
    Any rigidity by an automobile manufacturer, no matter how large or how well established, is severely penalized in the market.
    -Alfred P. Sloan Jr. (1965) My Years with General Motors.

    Longitudinal powertrain Audi vehicles with quattro are indistinguishable from RWD vehicles with Full-Time AWD; both meet the criteria to be labeled RWD/AWD - to argue otherwise is a “logical fallacy” (argumentum ad logicam). Hidden Content

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